Monthly Archives: September 2019

Decolonizing Consent

On September 24th 2019, I was invited to facilitate an arts-based workshop on decolonizing consent; reclaiming land and body for McGill University’s consent compaign. With support from the First People’s house and McGill’s response, education and support for sexual assault initive, this evening was made possible. Through an immersive experience,  participants were invited to create art and dialogue about environmental justice, multigenerational trauma and indigenous ways of knowing.

We, as a community, may not have change the system, extraction industries and commercialism, but we have changed the ways we have come to understand our connections between the land and body.

The Art of Art Therapists

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Between now and the end of September, an exhibition is being held at the La Ruche D’Art Art Hive. The Art Hive is a community art studio where individuals and groups are invited to freely create with the materials available, free of cost. This studio increases accessibility to community building, creativity and mental health support through the visual arts.

The current exhibition features both art therapists and art facilitators as they explore their own identity as professionals in the field. The artworks I have included in this exhibition are for sale. If interested, please contact me via my contact page to set up an e-transfer or visit the exhibition.

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Cellblock Mural

In July, the elders and I organized a mural project for ten Indigenous male inmates as part of their group work towards holistic and culturally safe healing at a federal prison. Together, from drawing the concept to its final realization, we spent two weeks co-creating a wall mural that extended throughout their cell block.

It was a moment of positive social exchange and teamwork as well as a moment of self-reflection and building cultural identity. It was access to cultural safety, identity and self-expression; it was trauma work.

There was both laughter and seriousness as we spent time in candid conversation, casually painting. There were moments of focus, contemplation and the delight of mixing colours. There was pride and courage to try something new as well as unconditional support when self doubt spoke too loud. There was joy and there was gratitude. Overtime, the wall began to transform into a change of seasons that blended each of their traditional territories, mirroring their own growth as people.

On the surface, what we created during those two weeks was a large colouring painting but what we really did was make social change